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13 Key Landing Page Metrics You Need To Track Now

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Think it’s hard to know which landing page metrics are the most important to track and follow? You’ve come to the right place.

There are a lot of different landing page metrics that you could be tracking, and it can be tough to determine which ones are the most important for your business.

So we created this article to help you understand the metrics to improve your landing page success. Plus, we answer the most common questions about landing page metrics at the bottom of this post.

Let’s get started!

What Is A Landing Page?

A landing page is a web page where people can go to learn more about a product or service.

It’s usually the first page people see when they click on an ad or a link.

The purpose of a landing page is to get people to take action, such as signing up for a newsletter, downloading a white paper, requesting a quote, or buying a product.

What Are The Key Elements Of A Landing Page?

There are a few things you need to have on your landing page. The first is that it should be easy for people to learn more about your product or service. They should also be able to easily take action, such as signing up for a newsletter or buying a product.

Also, ensure you include the right keywords so people can find your landing page easily.

A well-designed landing page will have a clear call-to-action (CTA) and minimal distractions. This makes it easy for people to understand what they need to do and increases the chances that they’ll take the desired action.

Why Are Landing Pages Important?

Landing pages are important because they’re often the first interaction people have with your brand.

A well-designed landing page can make a good first impression and encourage people to learn more about your company.

Conversely, a poorly designed landing page can reflect poorly on your brand.

That’s why it’s important to spend time creating a high-quality landing page that reflects your brand well.

But now, let’s get to the actual landing page metrics!

1. Conversion Rate

Conversion rate is a measure of how successful your landing page is at getting people to take the desired action. This desired action can be signing up for a newsletter, buying a product, starting a free trial, etc.

It is a key metric that you need to track in order to determine the effectiveness of your landing page. Possibly even the most important landing page metric to track.

It is calculated by dividing the number of people who take the desired action by the total number of visitors to your landing page.

For example, if 100 people visit your landing page and 50 of them sign up for your newsletter, then your conversion rate would be 50%.

Conversion rate formula

What Is the Average Landing Page Conversion Rate?

The average landing page conversion rate is very dependent on the industry. Websites in the top 25% convert about 5.31% while the top 10% convert about 11.45%.

However, for landing page conversions across all industries, the rate is about 2.35%.

Here is the average conversion rate for different industries:

Conversion rate by industry

If you want to read more about conversion rate in different industries there are lots of videos and blog posts out there. This one we found to be very good.

What Is a Good Conversion Rate for a Landing Page?

Again it is very dependent on the industry. Most would probably agree that landing page conversion rates of 10% or higher are a good conversion rate.

There are also a lot of other things affecting the conversion rate. So the best way to get more conversions is:

  • Make it a habit to regularly test
  • Try different CTAs
  • Make big tests like changing the landing page design, and then move towards smaller tests like button placements and font types.

It is the big tests and improvements that will affect the conversion rate the most.

2. Landing Page Views

Google’s Analytics website explains page views as follows:

A pageview (or pageview hit, page tracking hit) is an instance of a page being loaded (or reloaded) in a browser. Pageviews is a metric defined as the total number of pages viewed.

Basically, it helps you understand which pages get the most traffic and which underperform.

It is easy to see and track your landing page views in Google Analytics.

Go to the menu on the left in your Analytics dashboard and select

  1. “Behavior”
  2. “Site Content”
  3. “All Pages”
Navigation to landing page views in Google Analytics

Here you will find all the pages and their respective page views.

Monitoring landing page views with Google Analytics

However, it will also show some other metrics like unique pageviews, average time on page, entrances, bounce rate, percent exit, and page value.

You can use the blue chart above to see trends in landing page views over the course of a few days or months.

That way you can see which days you get the most page views and whether for example, weekends improve or reduce your page views. Or if an ad or promotion was effective.

But remember that it is not landing page views that should be your main focus but rather conversions and the number of sales you make. Keeping that in mind, page views can be a great first indicator whether an SEO or ad campaign is working or not.

3. Bounce Rate

Google has explained the bounce rate like this:

A bounce is a single-page session on your site. In Analytics, a bounce is calculated specifically as a session that triggers only a single request to the Analytics server, such as when a user opens a single page on your site and then exits without triggering any other requests to the Analytics server during that session.

So in short it is the percentage of people that visit just visit one page on your website and then leave.

This essentially means that you want your bounce rate to be as low as possible.

Because a high bounce rate can be an indication that your website loads very slowly. Or that the landing page content is not appealing to your visitors.

Measure landing page metrics with bounce rate

What Is A Good Bounce Rate For A landing Page?

Anything with a bounce of less than 40% is really good but the average is around 50%. Any bounce rate above 50% is worth looking into to see what you can do to reduce it.

However, a landing page bounce rate of 60%-70% can also be good. It all depends on the website, industry, etc.

To find the bounce rate of your landing page in Google Analytics:

  1. In the sidebar menu go to “Behavior”
  2. “Site Content”
  3. “All Pages”

A few things to keep in mind regarding the bounce rate is that it can be a bit deceiving sometimes.

For example, if new visitors to your website spend a very long time on your page without going to other pages then that would still increase your bounce rate.

But, that doesn’t necessarily mean those visitors didn’t like the website or thought the content or graphics were bad.

4. Average Time On Page

The average amount of time someone spends on one page of your website is called “Average Time On Page.”

This is a good measure to see how interesting your website’s content is. If people spend a lot of time on one page, it might mean that the content is good.

If they are leaving right away, it might mean the content needs improvement.

On top of that, this landing page metric affects SEO as well. The longer a person stays on a page the more likely it is that the person likes the content. Which can improve your SEO rankings.

Google defines it like this:

Displays the average amount of time that visitors spend on a page of your site during Google Analytics sessions that are attributed to clicks on search or social objects.

Track landing page metrics with average time on page

What Is the Average Time on Page For a Landing Page?

This metric depends on many factors such as industries, audience, device type, content and layout of the page, etc.

But a good measure would be 52 seconds with the best website having about 82 seconds.

5. Sessions By Source

Sessions are the number of times a user interacts with your page. So what sessions by source essentially show you is where your landing page traffic is coming from.

This is important to know so that you can see what methods are working best in bringing visitors to your website.

For example, if you’re running an ad campaign on Facebook and you see that a lot of the traffic to your landing page is coming from Facebook then you know that campaign is effective and you should continue doing it.

To find this landing page metric in Google Analytics:

  1. In the sidebar menu go to “Acquisition”
  2. “All Traffic”
  3. “Source/Medium”
Sessions by source navigation in Google Analytics

From there you will be able to see all of the sources that are sending traffic to your website.

Sessions by source in Google Analytics

6. Pages Per Session

Pages per session are the average number of pages that a visitor views during one session on your website.

It shows you the average number of pages a website visitor accesses per session.

To remind you again, a session is the amount of time a website visitor is active on your website or specific landing pages. If a user is inactive for more than 30 min then any future activity is considered a new session.

This landing page metric is calculated by dividing the total number of page views by the total number of sessions.

Pages per session formula

Pages per session can help you understand if your content is valuable to your users and ultimately improve conversion rates.

For example, if people are only viewing one page, it might mean that the content is not interesting enough or needs improvement.

But if they are viewing multiple pages, it might mean that the content is engaging and keeping people’s attention.

To find out your pages per session in Google Analytics:

  1. Go to “Behavior”
  2. “Site Content”
  3. “Landing Pages”
Pages per session navigation in Google Analytics

There you will find the landing page URLs and their respective pages per session.

Track landing page metrics with pages per session

7. Return vs. New Visitors

This particular landing page metric is pretty simple.

Return visitors are people who have been to your website before. New visitors are people who have never been to your website before.

The return vs. new visitors metric is important because it helps you understand how well your landing pages are retaining users.

If a lot of people are returning, it means that they like what they see on your website and are coming back for more.

On the other hand, if very few people are returning it might mean that the content is not interesting enough or there is something else wrong with the website.

To find this information in Google Analytics:

  1. Go to “Audience”
  2. “Behavior”
  3. “New vs Returning”
New and returning visitors navigation in Google Analytics

There you will be able to see how many new and returning visitors your website has had.

Monitor landing page with new and returning visitors

8. Form Abandonment

Form abandonment is when a user begins to fill out a form on your website but then leaves it unfinished.

This is an important landing page metric because it can help you understand why users are not converting.

There could be many reasons for form abandonment such as:

  • users not finding what they are looking for
  • being asked for too much or too sensitive information
  • the form is too long or complicated
  • the user is unsure about what to do next
  • etc.

9. Session Duration

Session duration is the time when there are interactions between the user and the website.

For example, if a landing page visitor lands on your landscaping website at 10:15 and looks around and reads through your website. Then exits the website at 10:50, the session duration would be 35 min.

Visual representation of session duration

To find session duration in Google Analytics:

  1. Go to “Behavior”
  2. “Site Content”
  3. “Landing Pages”
Session duration navigation in Google Analytics

Here you can find the session duration.

Track landing page metrics with session duration

10. Traffic Sources

Traffic sources show you where your landing page gets traffic from.

The most common traffic sources are:

  • Organic traffic – people who found your landing page through search engines like Google
  • Direct – people who typed the landing page’s URL in their browser and go straight to the page
  • Referral – Visitors coming to your landing page from another website by clicking a link
  • Social media – Visitors that come from social media
  • Email – Visitors that are coming from your emails or newsletter
  • Ads – Visitors from ads like Google Ads or Facebook Ads

To find this information in Google Analytics:

  1. Go to “Acquisition”
  2. “All Traffic”
  3. “Source/Medium”
Landing page monitoring with traffic sources

This will show you all the different channels that your website gets traffic from.

See the sources of all your traffic from landing pages

You can also go to:

  1. “Acquisition”
  2. “All Traffic”
  3. “Channels”

This will give you an overview of all the traffic channels.

11. Exit Pages

Another metric to measure landing page success is exit pages. It is the page that your visitor leaves your website from.

For example, if a website visitor reads a blog post on your website and then leaves, then that blog post is the exit page.

This is an important landing page metric because it can help you understand why users are not converting.

For example, if a landing page has a long session duration and after a while visitors exit that page, then adding a CTA in some strategic positions can help improve the landing page success and conversion rate.

There are also different reasons why someone might exit, such as:

  • users not finding what they are looking for
  • being asked for too much or too sensitive information
  • the form is too long or complicated
  • the user is unsure about what to do next
  • etc.

To find the exit pages in Google Analytics:

  1. Go to “Behaviour”
  2. “Site Content”
  3. “Exit Pages”
Exit pages navigation in Google Analytics

Here you can see the number of exits each page has, page views, and the number of exits per page view as a percentage.

List of exit pages for landing page monitoring

12. Devices Used

This landing page metric can help understand what devices were used by your website visitors when they were on your landing page.

To see devices used in Google Analytics:

  1. Got to “Audience”
  2. “Mobile”
  3. “Overview”
Devices used navigation in Google Analytics

Here you can see what types of devices (desktop, tablet, phone) were used and some data like sessions, bounce rate, session duration, etc. for each device.

Landing page monitoring with device category

If you select “Devices” instead of “Overview” you will find the actual device info, for example, Apple iPhone.

And of course some data respective to each device.

Landing page monitoring with device types

13. Interaction Per Visit

Interaction per visit is the average number of interactions a visitor has on your landing page. An interaction can be anything from a click and hovers to scrolls.

This is an important landing page metric because it can help you understand how engaged your website visitors are. And some of the reasons why some visitors don’t convert.

The better you understand this the more likely you are to make improvements and iterations that increase conversions and online visibility.

FAQ

What are the most important metrics for a website?

The most important landing page metrics to track depends on what your goals are with the landing page. But if I had o choose one it would be conversion rate.

How do you measure web traffic?

There are many ways to measure web traffic. The most common way is through web analytics tools like Google Analytics.

What is cost per conversion?

Cost per conversion is the amount of money you spend on advertising divided by the number of conversions. For example, if you spend $100 on ads and get 20 conversions, then your cost per conversion would be $100/20 = $50.

How do you measure website effectiveness/engagement?

There are many ways to measure website effectiveness and engagement. The landing page metrics in this blog post are a great way to measure landing page success and website effectiveness.

On top of that other things to keep in mind are website speed, keyword rankings, broken links, and the number of backlinks.

What KPI is the most common to measure when completing a landing page analysis?

For a landing page where the goal is to convert visitors to leads the most important landing page KPI is the conversion rate.

However, conversion rate might not be the best landing page metric to track for you. It is all based on your needs and what you want to achieve.

How can I improve my landing page performance?

The first question is, what do you mean by landing page performance? Do you mean more landing page traffic, more conversions, more impressions, average time on page, etc.?

Either way, if you want to improve your landing page performance, you need to track and measure the different landing page metrics. You can then use this information to make changes and improvements. Those will help increase your conversion rate and website effectiveness.

What metric comes to mind if there were landing pages that might suggest users’ experience was an issue when reaching a landing page?

There are a few metrics you can use to track user experience. Bounce rate is a landing page metric that can be indicative of user experience.

As mentioned earlier it is when a user lands on your landing page and then leaves without continuing to other pages.

Another landing page metric that might be worth looking at is the “average time on page”.

It tells you how long people are spending on your website. You can use this information to improve user experience and make your page more appealing.

What tool can you use to measure the effectiveness of a landing page?

The most obvious tool would be Google Analytics. It is a program that helps you track how people are using your website.

You can see things like how many people visited your website, what pages they looked at, and how long they stayed on each page.

This information can help you understand what people like and don’t like about your website, which can help you make changes to improve your website’s effectiveness.

This blog post here talks a bit more about the best landing page optimization tools.

Final Thoughts

Measuring the performance of your landing pages is key to understanding what’s working and what isn’t so you can make improvements. The landing page metrics highlighted in this post are some of the most important ones to track. However, there are many more that could also be useful depending on your business goals. 

If you are interested in reading more about how to optimize your website then our small business SEO checklist might be interesting for you.

Hope you found this post useful! Have a nice day!

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